Middle Fork River Expeditions

Drift Boat Fly Fishing on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River in Idaho

Drift Boat Fly Fishing on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River in Idaho is the way to catch the most fish from a boat.  We use Hog Island HDPE roto-molded mcKenzie Drift boats.  Drift Boat Fly Fishing on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River in Idaho with these boats is ideal as they have large padded casting braces on the bow and stern of the boat.  Drift Boat Fly Fishing on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River in Idaho has never been easier and as cost effective as they are on a Middle Fork River Expeditions trip.  There is not an additional cost to rotate into a Hog Island for Drift Boat Fly Fishing on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River in Idaho.  All fishing is catch and release fishing using single barbless fly’s or hooks.  We fish for Western Cutthroat Trout while Drift Boat Fly Fishing on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River in Idaho.  We even carry a couple of Orvis Fly Rods for guest to become introduced to Drift Boat Fly Fishing on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River in Idaho or anywhere in the world.  You can be sure that Drift Boat Fly Fishing on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River in Idaho is the best in the world as well.  Fish are not huge, ranging from 10-14″, but an accomplished fly fisherman can catch over 100 fish a day no problem.

One of MFRE’s fly fishing guides, Willis McAleese, is hand making custom Drift boats in Pocatello with is new company, Lost River Boat Works.  These drift boats are of the highest quality using the stitch and glue process.  Willis will bring one of these custom drift boats on the river this summer, so come and check it out.

Middle Fork River Expeditions offers Drift Boat Fly Fishing on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River in Idaho with exclusive 2 to 1 fisherman/guide ratio on our September dates.  Never has Drift Boat Fly Fishing on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River in Idaho been so accessable to so many people.

Come on out and learn to fly fish this summer, or for the veteran angler, come have the time of your life.   Drift Boat Fly Fishing on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River in Idaho is just waiting for you.

We hope to see you in Stanley this summer.

Yours for fishing, Ellsworth

Drift Boat Fly Fishing on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River in Idaho

Drift Boat Fly Fishing on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River in Idaho

Rivers are a very noble cause to run free.

This summer in Idaho, you can have a connection and know why rivers are a noble cause to run free. With Middle Fork River Expeditions, there are no strangers here, only friends you have not met.

By a past MFRE guest…..

This summer my family and I enjoyed a week of rafting on the pristine Middle Fork of the Salmon River in Idaho. Before we went on the river to begin our six day rafting trip, a forest ranger with the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness, instructed us as to the rules and regulations that must be observed to maintain the pollution free river. She talked with us about the damaging effects of micro trash; those small, inconsequential things that we leave behind without a second thought. To name a few: dental floss, hairpins, matches, stray coins, toothpicks, and buttons. We were told that there were to be no remains, whatsoever, left behind when we exited a campsite. Ten thousand people a year go on the river, and when all is said and done, there should be nothing left behind to indicate that anyone at all has paid the river a visit.

I was impressed with the total effort to keep the river and the banks pollution free. In our week on the Middle Fork I did not see any signs of trash. Everyone that was on the river took their trash with themÑeven the porto-potties!

This trip piqued my interest in the condition of America’s rivers. Are other rivers in the U.S. as clean and litter free as the Middle Fork of the Salmon River?

In researching American rivers I found some very interesting facts:

1. Rivers are home to 80% of the wildlife in the western United States pfizer viagra commande.
2. Rivers are also home to over 50% of the bird species in our country.
3. More than 40% of all species of fish live in freshwater rivers and streams.
4. Rivers and streams are the habitat to countless plant and animal species. Rivers and streams are the core foundation for healthy ecosystems. They provide wildlife with nesting, breeding and feeding areas.
In order for a river to be healthy, water levels need to fluctuate naturally. What does this mean? It means that every river is different and that the flow of a river is cyclical, varying greatly on time scales, whether short term or long term. Regional differences in climate, vegetation, and geology affect the natural flows of rivers.

Why is the natural flow of rivers important? It determines the size of rivers, where it flows, and the amount and type of habitat existing along riverbanks. The plants, fish, and wildlife have evolved to depend on the natural flow and unique rhythms of any given river.

There was a time in our country’s history when every river in America was a ” scenic and wild” one. According to the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act: “A wild river represents a vestige of primitive America, with generally inaccessible shorelines. A scenic river is still largely primitive but is accessible in some places by roads.”

Six rivers that are classified as ” wild and scenic” in the United States are: the Fortymile in Alaska, the Verde in Arizona, Idaho’s mighty Salmon, the Obed in Tennessee, Maine’s Allagash, and Florida’s Loxahatchee. These rivers represent some of our national treasures.

What has happened to our rivers and streams? Why are they not all “wild and scenic”? As America was being formed, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers was established in 1776 to help build and maintain America’s infrastructure. The Army Corps of Engineers has had a tremendous impact on our nation’s water resources by straightening, deepening, constructing floodwalls and levees, and damning our rivers. It is estimated that this federal agency, more than any other, has altered more than 30,000 miles of rivers and placed hundreds of species at risk of extinction. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, the number two cause of poor water quality (the first is agricultural pollution) is changes to the natural flow of water.

What can we do? We can create organizations to preserve or restore a river’s natural flow in our own towns. As activists, we need to determine the ecological needs and human demands on a river to determine what the optimum flow should be. At the very least, we should ensure that river flows are enough to sustain essential ecological functions and meet the needs of human health and recreation. Allowing long-term rivers to flow naturally is the best way to have a continual supply of healthy water.

Individually we can conserve water, monitor local streams and rivers, notify local elected representatives to express concerns, and join a local river group. We can also advocate using less pesticides and herbicides and dispose of chemicals and oil in the correct manner.

I know we all don’t need one more “cause.” But, after my experience on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River, I am convinced, that this, more than ever, is one “cause” we cannot ignore.”

If you want to connect to the rivers in a dory, a raft, a drift boat, a kayak or a stand up paddle board please know that they are all available on trips with Middle Fork River Expeditions.

Yoga on the Middle Fork Salmon River

Yoga on the Middle Fork Salmon River

Family River Rafting Vacations in Idaho on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River

Family River Rafting Vacations in Idaho on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River are best in the summer months. A Family River Rafting Vacations in Idaho on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River is a great way to bond with your family away from technology and screens. Family River Rafting Vacations in Idaho on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River is a unique experience as you can un-plug from modern life and re-connect with oneself and the greater world around them. A lifetime journey on Family River Rafting Vacations in Idaho on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River is what it’s all about. Family River Rafting Vacations in Idaho on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River is waiting for you. If you want to get away from it all then Family River Rafting Vacations in Idaho on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River is the best way to do it.

We hope to see you this summer on a Family River Rafting Vacation in Idaho on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River with Middle Fork River Expeditions.

See you in Stanley! Ellsworth

Family River Rafting Vacations in Idaho on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River

Middle Fork Salmon River Rafting in Idaho is the best family vacation

Middle Fork Salmon River Rafting in Idaho is the best family vacation because it allows one to get away from all the technology for a week in the wilderness. Middle Fork Salmon River Rafting in Idaho is the best family vacation for lots of other reasons though. It is the best time to bond on a Middle Fork Salmon River Rafting in Idaho is the best family vacation. Middle Fork River Expeditions offers Middle Fork Salmon River Rafting in Idaho is the best family vacation all summer long. In fact MFRE offers Middle Fork Salmon River Rafting in Idaho is the best family vacation starting in May thru October every year, so 6 months of river rafting. There is not a better way to re-connect with family on a Middle Fork Salmon River Rafting in Idaho is the best family vacation.

We hope to see you on a Middle Fork Salmon River Rafting in Idaho is the best family vacation this summer.

Best, Ellsworth

Middle Fork Salmon River Rafting in Idaho is the best family vacation

Main Salmon River Dory

Main Salmon River Dory

Willis just finished an 18 foot Briggs Whitewater Dory for MFRE on the Main Salmon. Check it out!

Snowpack at Great Levels for the Middle Fork and Idaho in General

Recorded and releases by IOGA- Idaho Outfitters and Guides Association

BOISE, Idaho — (Feb. 1, 2012) — A series of major snowstorms boosted snowpacks dramatically in the second half of January, quickly re-positioning Idaho’s world-renowned rivers into an “ideal” scenario with plenty of water for a fun-filled spring and summer season, officials said this week.
“What a difference a week makes,” said Ron Abramovich, Idaho snow survey supervisor for the Natural Resources Conservation Service.
Ten days of winter storms caused mountain snowpack levels to jump significantly throughout the state. In some river basins, like the Owyhee in Southwest Idaho, snowpack levels more than doubled. The Boise Basin went from 55 percent of normal in mid-January to 90 percent of normal as of Feb. 1, 2012.
The Salmon River, a popular national destination for family river trips, now has 85 percent of normal snowpack, and the Middle Fork of the Salmon, the second-most popular wilderness river trip in the United States next to the Grand Canyon, made a similar leap to 82 percent.
Idaho outfitters said the water levels associated with those snowpack levels should be “ideal.”
“We’re excited about it, and our customers are excited about it,” said Greg McFadden of Canyons, a Middle Fork and main Salmon outfitter that specializes in whitewater kayak instruction as part of weeklong river trips. “The kayak surfing should be great.”
Alison Steen, owner of Yellow Jacket River Guides who leads trips on the main Salmon, said the water levels “look perfect for us, as long as we continue to get ample amounts of snow the rest of this winter.”
Plenty of moisture will ward off wildfires and the rivers will peak earlier at an 85 percent level, making for a longer summer season, warmer water temperatures, bigger riverside beaches in August, and a longer fishing season, Steen said. “It’s looking pretty darn ideal!”
Outfitters on the Lochsa and Selway rivers also like the way the winter snowpacks are shaping up. The Clearwater River Basin increased from 67 percent to 92 percent of normal snowpack levels as a result of the January storms.
“It’s looking to be a safe, enjoyable level,” said Marty Smith, owner of Three Rivers Rafting, which runs trips on the Salmon, Selway and Lochsa rivers. “If we get too much snow up here, it turns people off.”
Both the Selway and the Lochsa are robust whitewater rivers with a lot of Class 4 rapids (on a scale of 1 to 6, with 6 being an unrunnable waterfall) stacked up one after the other. Ninety percent runoff means the rivers will be plenty high for white-knuckle rafting enthusiasts in the spring months, Smith said, but they won’t be peaking at super-high unsafe levels.
Idaho’s rivers that are fed by reservoirs, such as the Snake River, will have plenty of flows this summer regardless because reservoirs are nearly full throughout the Snake River Basin, Abramovich said. That means Hells Canyon of the Snake is likely to have robust river flows throughout the summer season, providing lots of thrills for whitewater rafters and kayakers.
“It’s looking like a great season,” said Jerry Hughes, owners of Hughes River Expeditions, which offers guided trips on Hells Canyon, the Middle Fork Salmon, Lower Salmon, and Grand Ronde rivers.
An abundance of runoff on the Snake River means there will be a whitewater season on the Class 4+ Murtaugh reach of the Snake River near Twin Falls, and plenty of flows for fishing, floating and camping on two fly fishing jewels — the Henrys Fork and South Fork Snake River in Eastern Idaho.
The only river basins with deficient flows at this point are the Bruneau and Owyhee rivers. Their snowpacks were about 65 percent of normal as of Feb. 1. With more winter storms in the forecast in the coming month, it’s possible that those basins could catch up, Abramovich said. Last year, both desert rivers had the longest season in 20+ years, nearly three months, with well over 180 percent snowpacks.
For more information, contact Grant Simonds at the Idaho Outfitters and Guides Association, 208-336-3014 or see www.ioga.org.

 
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